Jose Palomino

From the yearly archives:

2009

Carefully crafted messages alone won’t sell your product or service. You must target your message for your best audience and via the most effective venues. While doing this you must continuously refine your position against relevant competitors in the marketplace.

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The Schlage Link Deadbolt Lock. Ok. That is cool. A little unsettling from a security POV – but cool.
But it costs $200 – $300!
So – this is a cool idea that is Innovative and even a little Wow! (Inspiring) – but does its utility (Indispensability) pass a common-sense cost/benefit test?
That is the question.

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Robot Love

December 10, 2009

A recent MSNBC article on “Scientists, lawyers mull effects of home robots” had some interesting observations on how people FEEL about their purchases.
Specifically, there was a paragraph and quote that caught my eye: “Shoppers personalize their Roombas, naming and decorating them, for example. Angle recalled an incident when a soldier plucked a banged-up military robot nicknamed Scooby from an Iraqi battlefield and carried it to a depot to be fixed. It’s doing you a service, you’re going to get attached to it.”

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My son posted the link to the video below on his Facebook page. It’s worth taking 2 minutes to check out: (the folks who compiled it are www.overthinkingit.com) It brought a smile to my face as it brought memories to the surface of some great (and some not-so-great) movie moments. And… it made me think […]

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AT&T’s response to Verizon’s brilliant “Map for That” campaign is this: Make stuff up! The core problem with AT&T’s response is that anyone who uses AT&T – myself included – knows that it’s just not true. See the ad below and hear the galling “spin”. AT&T has a shoddy, overburdened and unreliable network. Verizon’s is the class of the field. Consumer Reports’ annual survey of 20 metro centers lists Verizon as number one in ALL markets surveyed. It’s not even close.

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Consumers are using the iPhone to read eBooks. I know I do, and it’s not a great experience. The selling point is that since I always have my iPhone with me, the service is accessible to me at any time, day or night. Regardless of what I want to read, or when I want to read it – from Chris Anderson’s “Free” to Malcolm Gladwell’s “Outliers” – the service is always there. I might listen to the audio book, or I might listen to the audio book and read along, which cognitively for me makes things stick.

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So much of what’s out there today is old thinking. Not old marketing or old sales thinking. But rather, the “silo” approach which separates these functions as if they existed independent of one another. The fact is that they are as dependent on one another as nutrition and exercise are for improving someone’s overall health. Except in a company looking to achieve its revenue and market share goals, the overall health is the ability to impact a specific market.

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So often, especially with smaller businesses, companies don’t really understand that their prospects look at the world of opportunities, the world of options very differently than they think they do. They often think that prospects are looking at the universe of options that look like them, i.e., a new type of printing service, or a new type of contact management software, (or some other kind of category that their wares most closely fits in to) and that their prospects are only looking at other companies that are just like them.

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